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Gift Planning

Helping a Child Smile

Lexie Diskin and other patients with similar needs receive the best possible care because our physicians have wonderful support from friends like Fred Angle.

Lexie Diskin and other patients with similar needs receive the best possible care because our physicians have wonderful support from friends like Fred Angle.

Fred E. Angle can't count how many times he has read Mr. Anonymous, the story of William Volker, a local philanthropist who shaped the landscape of our community. Over the years, he has given numerous copies of the book to others in hopes that Volker's silent generosity will inspire them the way it has inspired him.

Raised the son of a Kansas City, Kansas, physician, Fred's father gave him insight into the world of pediatric medicine and the health care needs experienced by local families.

From 1944 to 1946, Fred served in the U.S. Marine Corp. He saw fellow soldiers return home from World War II scarred and injured. In an era before reconstructive surgery was commonplace, adults and children with facial disfigurement were often ostracized, discrimination that stands out in Fred's memory.

Before retirement, Fred was proprietor of automotive dealerships in the Northland. His business and community involvement led him to befriend Children's Mercy benefactor, Jerry Smith, who introduced him to the hospital. After hearing Children's Mercy physician Dr. Fred McCoy speak about advances in pediatric plastic surgery, Fred decided to create a restricted provision for craniofacial surgery in his trust, making him a member of the Children's Mercy Legacy Honor Roll.

Fred and his wife, Lillian, enjoy travel and collecting memories from adventures they have had around the globe. He is pleased life's path led him to Children's Mercy and is happy to have created a planned gift that will improve the quality of life for countless children—like Lexie Diskin—served by Children's Mercy.

Lexie's Story
"Your baby looks to have a cleft lip and palate." The words ran through Wendi Diskin's head as she lay on the sonogram table for a routine prenatal visit. The Diskins, who lived in Tulsa, Okla., began researching and soon were on the phone with the craniofacial and plastic surgery staff at Children's Mercy.

As it turned out, Lexie had bigger concerns. When she was born, not only did she have a cleft lip and palate, but she also had Goldenhar Syndrome and was missing her left ear, jaw and cheekbone. The entire left side of her face was small and underdeveloped. At 14 days of age, Lexie was transferred to Children's Mercy.

Lexie has undergone four major surgeries with Dr. Virender Singhal to reconstruct her face and is currently undergoing bilateral mandibular distraction to improve her sleep apnea and increase the symmetrical appearance of her mandible.

"When we got to Children's Mercy, they reassured us that everything was going to be just fine and that they see kids like Lexie all the time," Wendi says. "The care we've received from everyone at Children's Mercy has been outstanding."

If you would like to know more about Lexie's story, click here.

You Can Help
You can ensure that excellent health care is available for children like Lexie for years to come through a planned gift to Children's Mercy.

eBrochure Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the brochure.

A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to Children's Mercy a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

"I give to Children's Mercy, a nonprofit corporation currently located at Kansas City, MO, or its successor thereto, ______________* [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose."

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor advised fund is an account that you set up but which is managed by a nonprofit organization. You contribute to the account, which grows tax-free. You can recommend how much (and how often) you want to distribute money from that fund to Children's Mercy or other charities. You cannot direct the gifts.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal’s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset—such as real estate or stock—since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

You give assets to a trust that pays our organization set payments for a number of years, which you choose. The longer the length of time, the better the potential tax savings to you. When the term is up, the remaining trust assets go to you, your family or other beneficiaries you select. This is an excellent way to transfer property to family members at a minimal cost.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets—and may qualify for a federal income tax charitable deduction when you itemize. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Children's Mercy as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets—and may qualify for a federal income tax charitable deduction when you itemize. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Children's Mercy as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and Children's Mercy where you agree to make a gift to Children's Mercy and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.

Personal Estate Planning Kit Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the materials for planning your estate.